County employees, tenants hear preliminary details
by Michele Longworth
Sep 03, 2014 | 982 views | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Courthouse employees, officeholders and courthouse tenants listen to Eric Weflen as he presents the options his firm is working on for the county commissioners.  A finished feasibility study will be presented to the board later this year.
Courthouse employees, officeholders and courthouse tenants listen to Eric Weflen as he presents the options his firm is working on for the county commissioners. A finished feasibility study will be presented to the board later this year.
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Massac County commissioners, officeholders and courthouse tenants had a chance to see the preliminary data that has been collected by RQAW Engineer Eric Weflen, when he visited with courthouse officeholders last month.

Meetings were scheduled Thursday and Friday in the large courtroom, with many county officials in attendance to hear the preliminary details.

Weflen, began by looking at all of the square footage of each floor of the courthouse and a breakdown of square feet per department. Those figures of square footage were then given a score from one to 10, with one being unacceptable and 10 being appropriate.

The lowest score based on square footage is the commissioners room, with only 285 square feet, scoring a 2.00. The space does not allow for very many people to attend a commissioners meeting. The other low scoring department is Massac County Emergency Services and Disaster Agency, with 520 square feet, scoring a 3.38.

Weflen presented three options. The first — option A, would re-locate the offices of County Clerk, Treasurer, ESDA, Assessors Office, General Assistance, Cache River Drainage District and Shawnee Development into the Banterra Bank building and would also include a new justice center building to be constructed just south of the current detention center. That building would contain the offices of Massac County State’s Attorney, Circuit Clerk, Probation and the Massac Circuit Court.

Option B would allow for all of the county’s offices, including the judicial branch to be re-located to the Banterra Bank Building and would include an addition to the building where the current drive-thru lanes are located.

And, the final option would include modification of the courthouse’s existing spaces and would also include a renovation of the exterior of the building. The design would replace the courthouse’s mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems and also includes the upgrading, replacement or repair of the courthouse’s flooring, plaster and paint.

Weflen said primarily the purpose of the meetings is for the employees and officeholders to make sure the information he collected a month ago is all accurate and to lay out all of the facts and to get feedback from the various offices.

Massac County Commissioner Jerel Childers said Weflen did an excellent job presenting the information, but Childers said he was disappointed because it seemed when he made a suggestion, he did not take it to heart.

“He did an excellent job of figuring all those things out,” said Commissioner Jayson Farmer.

Wefelen told those at the meeting in the final draft of the feasibility study, there will be dollar figures for each option, “Numbers aren’t fun, but it is important because it lays a foundation.”

According to Weflen, when RQAW presents its final feasibility study to the board, they want the study to be meaningful and substantial.

As a taxpayer and/or resident of Massac County, which option do you think would be the best option?


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